FAQ

Here are my most frequently asked questions. If your question is not answered here, please click Contact and let me know what is on your mind.

Who do you coach?
What is the difference between coaching and therapy?
In that case, would you refer your coaching client to you since you are also a licensed psychotherapist?
What is the difference between coaching and consulting?
What if I work in a field you don’t have expertise in?
How do I know if you are the right coach for me?
How often do we meet?
Where do we meet?
How long do you typically work with a client?
How much does coaching cost?
How soon can we get started?

Who do you coach?
People who are interested in their personal and professional development and are willing to be challenged and supported.

The clients I work best with are those who are ready and willing to do the necessary “discovery work” I guide them through. No one I’ve ever worked with has ever declined this opportunity to learn more about one’s self in the service of their success and happiness.

What is the difference between coaching and therapy? (I see you are a licensed psychotherapist and a professional coach.)

There is a world of difference between coaching and psychotherapy; the similarity is that both approaches are designed to assist people to function better and more effectively in their worlds. Many kinds of therapy involve reviewing the past circumstances of one’s life to address the route of the “problem” and focuses on “talking-it-out” for symptom relief and healing.

Coaching isn’t “problem” oriented. I see “challenges” or “circumstances” as “opportunities” to grow as a human being – both professionally and personally. With my assistance, clients target their goals and move towards them rapidly to achieve them. As “blocks” to progress arise, I take them through a process of discovery that leads to profound insight and change. And results.

Another huge and critical difference between a coach and a therapist is that when coaching a client, if after a reasonable period of time my client is unable to benefit from a “coach approach” because there are, in fact, issues in their lives that need resolving (substance abuse, trauma, issues from the past) and are interfering in their ability to benefit from coaching, I will either recommend they see a therapist while I continue to coach them on their business goals or – depending on the situation – I might suggest they seek therapy and come back to coaching once certain issues are addressed and well-managed.

In that case, would you refer your coaching client to you since you are also a licensed psychotherapist?

No, I never wear two hats with one client. But I will offer to help my client find a therapist if he or she would like my support in that process.

What is the difference between coaching and consulting?

In theory, they could not be more different.

The word “coaching” has unfortunately become genetic, just as the word “Kleenex” for “tissue” has. For example, you might say, “I need a Kleenex” when you feel a sneeze coming on. The truth is, in most cases, you really couldn’t care less if it was a Kleenex, Scott or Target brand. “Just give me a tissue already!”

Consultants, in many cases, see the value of marketing themselves as “coaches” and consequently have diluted the meaning of “coaching” these days. By doing so, consultants are short-changing themselves and creating confusion. You see, there is a need for both coaches and consultants.

Case-in-point: If an accountant or financial advisor is “telling” you how to set up your books or how to maximize your returns – that is a consultant – even if they are calling themselves a “coach.” If you have financial concerns and you are working with someone who is “coaching” you to look at your lifestyle or business and guiding you towards making wiser choices, that is a coach.

Consultants share their expertise and tell you want you should do. Coaches spend more time asking questions and guiding you through a profound process that impacts dramatically on the quality of your business and life. Coaches do not need to be experts in your field nor, quite frankly, know anything about it before starting to work with you. That said, if I have expertise or knowledge about something that will be useful to you, I will share my experiences and make “suggestions.”

For example, one of my “success stories” wanted to work with me again after several years had passed. In the time we worked together she left corporate America and started her own business. The endless string of accolades, media, and business opportunities her company continues to receive is impressive. It was now time, she said, to accelerate her business growth and she was at a crossroads, and re-experiencing the anxiety and fear we effectively dealt with when we first worked together years ago.

So, she thought, I helped her before when she was getting started – I could help her again. Within that first session it was clear to me she didn’t need a coach to hold her hand – what she needed was information! She needed a consultant – specifically a manufacturing expert that could tell her EXACTLY what she needs to do to improve her margins, increase cash flow and generate more profit.

And that is what I told her. At first she resisted. “How am I going to find the right consultant?!” Using a few choice words and with a velvet hammer in my hand, I told her I trusted her to figure that one out.

And by the next day she had. She sent me an email with all the actions she took to find a consultant, including contacting SCORE, a free service of former business owners who now volunteer their services to business owners. Her voice was ringing with pride, confidence – and relief!

What if I work in a field you don’t have expertise in?
An effective coach doesn’t need to know a thing about the technical aspects of your business. That said, if you feel more comfortable with someone who knows the ins and outs of your type of industry then consider hiring a professional coach who comes from your industry. Depending on the challenges you are facing perhaps what you may need is a consultant who is an expert in your field. You could actually need a coach (with or without experience in your field) and a consultant. In the end, I encourage you to hire people you have confidence in.

How do I know if you are the right coach for me?
Finding a coach can be like “dating.” You want to feel comfortable and notice some kind of chemistry before going on the second “date.” When you are having an initial consultation you should feel very comfortable and confident that this person is there for you. I have had many clients tell me they spoke to several coaches and once they spoke to me they knew I was the one. But the Talk It Out meeting will help make that clear to each of us.

How often do we meet?
Typically we meet three times a month for 30 to 50 minutes – again depending on your plan. Some clients I work with twice a month – some weekly. Three times a month with one week off is ideal for most people.

Where do we meet? Your office? My office?
Actually, most of the time we meet on the telephone line. I’ve been coaching and/or counseling people on the phone since 1998 so I am very adept at “hearing” between the lines. Clients are amazed when I “catch” them slouching in their chair or sense when their energy is low. You may have noticed I have clients from all over. Skype is another wonderful tool and works great with local and international clients as well.

Occasionally I meet with local clients in my office – but that is rare. People really enjoy the convenience and time savings of telephone appointments along with the value they get from our coaching.

How long do you typically work with a client?
A typical engagement is between 6 months to one year. That said, I have one client I am still working with seven years later. She is a mother of two children with a highly demanding career. We have touched upon every area of her life including her retirement dreams of vineyards and chateaus. Then there was the filmmaker who after two months of coaching got exactly what she needed to get her film produced.

How much does coaching cost?
Think of coaching as an investment in yourself or career. As with most good investments, what you get out of it depends on what you put into it. Coaching packages begin at $295. and go up to $900. a month for any kind of private Individual Coaching. Ask about rates for Partnership and Corporate Coaching.

How soon can we get started?
Schedule your Talk it Out session right now. How is that for fast?!

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